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Levi Strauss 1873-1973

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silencejoe View Drop Down
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    Posted: 03 Apr 2021 at 6:44am
Originally posted by Denimseeker Denimseeker wrote:

Nice one Joe,
Judging from the paper patch fragment I will put it late 50s early 60s, what do you think?


Yes i guess early 60s
Ijust found dr. information are very helpful

https://www.denimbro.com/thrifters-thread-levis-501-1960s1990s_topic2908.html
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Denimseeker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Apr 2021 at 4:31am
Nice one Joe,
Judging from the paper patch fragment I will put it late 50s early 60s, what do you think?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (5) Thanks(5)   Quote silencejoe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Mar 2021 at 6:11am
50s levis





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sansome Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Mar 2021 at 7:15pm
Most were big sizes 40 & 42 W then 27w
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote silencejoe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Mar 2021 at 4:31pm
Originally posted by Sansome Sansome wrote:

Has anyone noticed the unusual amount of deadstock Levi’s surfacing from the 60’s and 70’s? I noticed it on Instagram months ago, then I was contacted to buy some- someone over in Europe had a large collection, I don’t know if the died or what happened, for a lucky few, dozens of pairs were picked up for next to nothing....I got ahold of 9 pairs ( I paid good money) I’ll post some of the pairs that I got- here.

Wow lucky you im looking for some size 36 to 34 deadstock
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Sansome Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Mar 2021 at 9:30am
Has anyone noticed the unusual amount of deadstock Levi’s surfacing from the 60’s and 70’s? I noticed it on Instagram months ago, then I was contacted to buy some- someone over in Europe had a large collection, I don’t know if the died or what happened, for a lucky few, dozens of pairs were picked up for next to nothing....I got ahold of 9 pairs ( I paid good money) I’ll post some of the pairs that I got- here.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote gcdrygoodsco Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Mar 2021 at 3:36pm
Your question is complicated.  The weight of denim in the old days was based on linear yards to the pound, and was normally about 28" in width, finished.  This requires a conversion.  Many companies, no name-dropping, have "reproduced" with historical accuracy, without the key piece of knowledge that conversion is required.  Sadly, some of these brands have spent money on marketing just how accurate their reproduced cloth is, but if you directly compared it to an original, it wouldn't feel similar at all.  The shade might be right, and the harness count matched, but this doesn't guarantee the knowledge related to loomstate and the method of weighing was taken into consideration. Thus, the only answer that is logical is:  it depends on the cloth, the mill that produced it, and the brand that cut and sewed it.  

I hope that answer helps satisfy your question.  

Greetings from Greensboro, NC.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Denimseeker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Mar 2021 at 11:20pm
Hi friend, thanks for your input. Incredible piece of information. 
Just one more question to ask:
So is the denim weight conversion only required when you are comparing the shuttle loom denim (28-29' width) and the projectile loom denim (~59' width)?
Say if I have a pair of modern jeans which were claimed to be made by 10oz shuttle loom denim, are they as heavy as a pair of vintage (say, 1930s) 10oz denim jeans?

Thanks
Greetings from Hong Kong =)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (6) Thanks(6)   Quote gcdrygoodsco Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Mar 2021 at 5:58pm
It's of extreme importance to know the following:

Old denim was woven on 28" wide finished width off of Whitin and early Draper Northrop looms, so when a company states weight, you must do some extra division to make a present-day determination of the actual weight in the manner in which we measure today.

7oz = 9oz per square yard
8oz = 10.286oz per square yard
9oz = 11.57oz per square yard

However, even more importantly, sanforization was not invented until the 1920's, although some textile mills practiced their own finishing, more akin to decating, or with some solution mixture of ammonia aqueous, so you must take into account the shrinkage of these fabrics, which were unsanforized.

9oz shrank to roughly 13.5oz per square yard, or roughly 14.8%, just as an example.  This has been proven through fabric analysis on some of Mike Harris' early fabrics.

This element of denim construction has been severely overlooked by many companies attempting accurate reproductions of their garments.  This has led to the outpouring of poor information related to historical accuracy, and diluted the afficionado knowledge pool with claims that aren't true.

Even further, the way in which cloths for work garments, and many other categories of cloth for that matter, were denoted in terms of weight was by the yards linear to the pound.  In early 1900's header and ticket books, cloth sample books, and even handbooks on industrial fabrics, denim weight ranges from 1.4 to 3.5

1.4 = 14.69oz unsanforized, after shrink 16.89oz per square yard
3.5 = 5.88oz unsanforized, after shrink 6.75oz per square yard

It is also to note the following:

The first pants Jacob Davis made were of natural duck sail, a heavy canvas weave that was likely natural, unbleached cotton, and, based on the era, likely had flecks of boll and stem in it, which was probably quite beautiful.  This is proven in a court case against A.B. Elfelt for patent infringment, during which he was required to issue a testimony relating to the dates and particulars of his patentable invention.  

Amoskeag could not obtain synthetic indigo in the entire year of 1915, due to German embargo WWI-related, and likely had to stop production of XX cloth for Levis.  Simultaneously, White Oak Cotton Mill and Proximity Mill were producing denims, owned by Bavarian-Germans, and they only had to shut down one month, the month of August in 1915, due to embargo.  In 1913, Levi Strauss began ordering denim from their mills, and by 1916, stopped making mention of Amoskeag in their catalogs.  It was likely this that led them to experiment with logwood dye, which lacked colorfastness, yet was still purchased by Levi Strauss, who implored its use in their "Olympic Brand" line of garments.  By 1917, White Oak Cotton Mill became the exclusive supplier of XX denim, which was still 9oz, unsanforized, in the old measurements that would need conversion to present day numbers.

 







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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sansome Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Mar 2021 at 7:54am
Originally posted by brpac brpac wrote:

That's it -- perfect. Thank you!


Look at the last post on the Levi jacket thread, Maynard posted the link of the book you need.
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