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What are you reading?

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Topic: What are you reading?
Posted By: hollows
Subject: What are you reading?
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 7:52am
Books books books.

I just finished Murakami's Wind Up Bird Chronicle, just started Thomas Frank's The Conquest of Cool.

My top two summertime recommendations are Collected Fictions by Jorge Borges, and Actual Air by David Berman.  If you don't like those, we can't be friends.




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I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .



Replies:
Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 8:08am
Wind Up Bird Chronicle is my favorite Murakami book. What did you think?

Hope to look into the other books you mentioned, but my reading list is so ridiculously long!


Posted By: ranonranonarat
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 8:28am
good list hollows. i like the murakami stuff a lot and have a copy of IQ84 but haven't gotten around to reading that one yet. looked up "collected fictions" and seemed like something i might like. will check it out, thanks for the recommendation.

just finished "how to travel with a salmon" by umberto eco. one of the funniest reads (in a clever way) i've had in a while..

starting on "american psycho" by bret easton ellis now. finding it a little hard to get past the first few pages but hoping the rest of it will suck me in.

also taking time out with magazines like smith journal, cereal and kinfolk magazine. good publications and nice to read about non-clothing related material.


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faithless, the wonderboy


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 11:44am
Wind Up Bird was my first Murakami, so I don't have anything for direct comparison.  I like his style though, he does a great job of making it interesting to read the most mundane of scenes.  Doubly impressive that the effect survives translation.



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I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: swallowtail
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 1:59pm
im about to start siddhartha


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 3:03pm
I'm reading this thread.

IQ84 is amazing, possibly Murakami's best and I've read most of his books and probably all of his fiction.

I've recently finished 'Mr Tibbits's Catholic School' by Ysenda Maxtone Graham about a small Catholic boys prep school in west London, an incredibly funny read.

I've just bought 'The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared' by Jonas Jonasson and I recently received as a present, 'Where Have You Been?' by Joseph O'Connor. I need to decide which one to start next.


Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 3:20pm
Originally posted by hollows hollows wrote:

Wind Up Bird was my first Murakami, so I don't have anything for direct comparison.  I like his style though, he does a great job of making it interesting to read the most mundane of scenes.  Doubly impressive that the effect survives translation.



Perhaps part of the reason his style survives translation (other than the fact that Jay Rubin is a master!) is that Murakami was strongly influenced by an American writer, Raymond Chandler. I find it very interesting to read them alongside one another....


Posted By: Keg Bear
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 5:18pm
Anyone interested in wonderful descriptions of 1930's and 40's Los Angeles needs to read Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlow detective novels. The stories and writing style are amazing. 

There was a desert wind blowing that night. It was one of those hot dry Santa Anas that come down through the mountain passes and curl your hair and make your nerves jump and your skin itch. On nights like that every booze party ends in a fight. Meek little wives feel the edge of the carving knife and study their husbands' necks. Anything can happen. You can even get a full glass of beer at a cocktail lounge.
  • "Red Wind" (short story, 1938), published in Trouble Is My Business (1939)


Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 7:07pm
^^ +1. And The Long Goodbye is a really good place to start.


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 8:18pm
I'll go out on a limb and ask for suggestions. I've asked various other places, and quite simply I do not enjoy reading most books.

I find most fiction to be remarkably slow, and non-fiction to be unbearable.

I can't do fantasy/the vast majority of science fiction.  SUPER PICKY, I know.

It seems like when I like an author they don't publish a book for a few years (Walter Kern, Douglas Coupland) .

I've liked the Chuck Palahniuk I've read (Choke, Fight Club, Survivor, Rant), but haven't been able to keep interest with the majority of his newer works.




Posted By: Keg Bear
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 8:51pm
Another favorite is Frans G. Bengtsson's "The Longships" which I am reading again right now. Remarkable novel about Viking adventure. Hard to find in the US but worth the search. 


Posted By: Happy Hooligan
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2013 at 10:53pm
I tried reading a William Gibson's pattern recognition but boy was it slow and boring.  Like reading pages and pages of why a guy likes nylon jacket.    I had heard some good things about this guy but I had to stop 100 pages in.

I love Chandler.  I've read everything I can find from him, including all his shorts too.   Pretty much all 40's griddy crime I've read.  

I'm currently reading something most people here are not... Harry Potter.  I finally decided to see what all the hub-bub was about.  I'm on the third one now and actaully enjoy them a quite a lot.  Fast reads and full of action.   I might have to watch the movies now.  


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Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 30 Apr 2013 at 1:41am
Originally posted by Maynard Friedman Maynard Friedman wrote:

I'm reading this thread.

I've just bought 'The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared' by Jonas Jonasson and I recently received as a present, 'Where Have You Been?' by Joseph O'Connor. I need to decide which one to start next.


My lovelife played second fiddle to the "The hundered year old man" my wife could not put it down (the book that is)


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 30 Apr 2013 at 2:11am
So your wife preferred that old chap to yours I see!


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 30 Apr 2013 at 5:01am
Sadly that is true, She is reading "the book thief" now, judging by the tear stained pages even a good cry seems favourable.


Posted By: Bords
Date Posted: 03 May 2013 at 3:32pm
Made to Stick

Fantastic, use what I've learned so far in both professional and personal communication.


Posted By: Ali from Bath
Date Posted: 24 May 2013 at 12:19pm
Hi, Sorry to come onto this late, but I feel obliged to give one recommendation in particular :
Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts , it touches on many subjects and just utterly absorbs you in ..
Heroin smuggling Australian, but it goes so many places including spirituality and many other things
But just an amazing read ..


Posted By: dustydenimdad
Date Posted: 19 Aug 2013 at 7:05pm
Just finished reading Cheryl Strayed's books, Wild, and I it's one of the most captivating books I've ever had the pleasure of reading. I highly recommend it to anyone into wilderness; to anyone having a rough time at the moment and needs to be transported to a place in the mountains overlooking magnificent streams of pure-blue water; and, really, to anyone who enjoys good prose.


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 19 Aug 2013 at 7:28pm
I picked up a well worn copy of 'Sex drugs and cocoa puffs' by Chuck Klosterman yesterday.

I enjoy how he uses pop culture references to describe the mundane, it makes for an enjoyable read.




Posted By: rnrswitch
Date Posted: 19 Aug 2013 at 9:37pm
I'm reading Detroit: an American autopsy. Pretty good picture of current Detroit. It reads like a real life noir movie. It's great.

I tend not to read too much fiction. I feel like I don't get enough info out of fiction, although I do see the benefits of fiction. I tried and still pull it out every so often, infinite jest, but it is so difficult to read.

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Too bad your momma's a bitch, cuz I totally coulda been your daddy.


Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 20 Aug 2013 at 5:45am
^^ That sounds very very interesting. I need to check it out.

Currently I'm reading Murakami Haruki's "Shikisai o Motanai Tazaki Tsukuru to, Kare no Junrei no Toshi" or Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage. It's quite good so far. 

First time I've read one of his books in Japanese. Bit of a challenge for me. But I'm getting better at really enjoying Japanese lit by plowing through the kanji I'm not sure of, rather than obsessing over each sentence. 

Any Murakami fans out there? Ifyou haven't read his work I strongly suggest The Wind Up Bird Chronicle. 


Posted By: Boise
Date Posted: 20 Aug 2013 at 6:54am
Just finished With The Old Breed by E.B. Sledge.   Started  rereading Women by Bukowski

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He's like a goddamn seagull.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 20 Aug 2013 at 7:26am
^^I went through a Murakami phase back in 2008 after watching "A wild Sheep Chase"  Alan Yentob documentary for the BBC on the elusive Murakami.

It has become a bit cliched these days but since my teenage years i have read Kerouac's On the road cover to cover probably 20 times if i have an hour to spare i will read a couple of random chapters. I dont even know why anymore, I know it off by heart. I have well thumbed copies in the car, a copy at work and 2 at home?


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 20 Aug 2013 at 8:05am
'Where Have You Been?' by Joseph O'Connor.


Posted By: rnrswitch
Date Posted: 20 Aug 2013 at 6:59pm
I do love me some bukowski.


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Too bad your momma's a bitch, cuz I totally coulda been your daddy.


Posted By: Boise
Date Posted: 21 Aug 2013 at 7:40am
yep  Ham on Rye yum

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He's like a goddamn seagull.


Posted By: dustydenimdad
Date Posted: 21 Aug 2013 at 7:49am
Originally posted by Double 0 Soul Double 0 Soul wrote:

^^I went through a Murakami phase back in 2008 after watching "A wild Sheep Chase"  Alan Yentob documentary for the BBC on the elusive Murakami.

It has become a bit cliched these days but since my teenage years i have read Kerouac's On the road cover to cover probably 20 times if i have an hour to spare i will read a couple of random chapters. I dont even know why anymore, I know it off by heart. I have well thumbed copies in the car, a copy at work and 2 at home?


On the Road is such a fun read. You can feel the ebb and flow of his energy level as he rushes manically through his life. You ever read the Dharma Bums or Big Sur?


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 21 Aug 2013 at 9:55am
I have, Only once though, nothing like my On the road addiction. I used to read a lot of beat generation.
The pace of otr is down to Kerouacs amphetamine induced writing on one continuous roll of paper.
I would love to see the scroll in its entirety but living in the UK that probably wont happen.


Posted By: rnrswitch
Date Posted: 29 Aug 2013 at 7:43pm
Did you purchase the new scroll version of the book?  Basically just as it was written.

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Too bad your momma's a bitch, cuz I totally coulda been your daddy.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 30 Aug 2013 at 12:22am
Didn't know there was such a thing? Im not going to buy it Wink


Posted By: the bandanna almanac
Date Posted: 30 Aug 2013 at 5:22am
3rd time Reading Aubrey /Maturin 19 book series. On Desolation Island right now, one of my favorite books, and my favorite series. 


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 30 Aug 2013 at 9:09am
Just picked up The Divine Comedy, a book that I never had much interest in until I read Borges say "The Commedia is a book everyone ought to read. Not to do so is to deprive oneself of the greatest gift that literature can give us."

Pretty strong endorsement from a man whose opinion I respect above pretty much all others.

Anyone here a connoisseur?  I grabbed the Cary translation somewhat blindly, hopefully it's decent, but would be interested to hear thoughts on any favorite translations.


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I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: dustydenimdad
Date Posted: 30 Aug 2013 at 1:56pm
Originally posted by Double 0 Soul Double 0 Soul wrote:

Didn't know there was such a thing? Im not going to buy it Wink


Check out some of Kerouac's interviews after he published On the Road. Cool stuff!


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 30 Aug 2013 at 5:07pm





Posted By: Happy Hooligan
Date Posted: 23 Nov 2013 at 9:35pm

nothing like the film.


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Posted By: oomslokop
Date Posted: 07 Dec 2013 at 4:30am
@hollows paris review's http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/tag/divine-comedy/" rel="nofollow - blog had a divine comedy retrospective last month. on their http://theparisreview.tumblr.com/post/66216692804/with-his-feeling-for-the-grotesque-and-the" rel="nofollow - tumblr they put up a selection of different illustrations for the book, you might enjoy that (@theblackacre definitely will). they prefer the http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0385496982/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0385496982&linkCode=as2&tag=theparrev0f-20" rel="nofollow - hollander translation.

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rakuten is entertainment


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 07 Dec 2013 at 4:42am
Just finished George Orwell's 'The Lion and the Unicorn'. A very interesting read.


Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 07 Dec 2013 at 5:54am
"Yankees in the Land of the Gods", again. A really riveting book. What a weird weird encounter. It's truly amazing to think about how expansionary the US was already in the 1850s. Of course we know about the frontier of "the west" but really the whole Pacific was a frontier by mid 19th century.


Posted By: russell
Date Posted: 11 Jan 2014 at 2:18pm
Originally posted by Ishmael Ishmael wrote:

"Yankees in the Land of the Gods", again. A really riveting book. What a weird weird encounter. It's truly amazing to think about how expansionary the US was already in the 1850s. Of course we know about the frontier of "the west" but really the whole Pacific was a frontier by mid 19th century.

I'll have to look for that.  I recently finished Sea of Glory by Nathaniel Philbrick.  It's the story of the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838-1842.  It too takes place mostly in the Pacific, and speaks to U.S. ambitions and "insular annexations" as well.  It was quite an amazing adventure led by a total bastard.


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 11 Jan 2014 at 2:41pm
I've just started a Christmas present from my good lady, it's Morrissey's autobiography. Can't remember who it's by though...


Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 11 Jan 2014 at 3:12pm
Originally posted by russell russell wrote:

Originally posted by Ishmael Ishmael wrote:

"Yankees in the Land of the Gods", again. A really riveting book. What a weird weird encounter. It's truly amazing to think about how expansionary the US was already in the 1850s. Of course we know about the frontier of "the west" but really the whole Pacific was a frontier by mid 19th century.

I'll have to look for that.  I recently finished Sea of Glory by Nathaniel Philbrick.  It's the story of the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838-1842.  It too takes place mostly in the Pacific, and speaks to U.S. ambitions and "insular annexations" as well.  It was quite an amazing adventure led by a total bastard.


That one has been on my very long Amazon wish list for a long time now. Sounds like the US Expedition of the Pacific and the Japan expedition were both run by bastards. Commodore Matthew Perry was a real dick as well.

The only work I've read by Philbrick is his "Why Read Moby Dick". Very interesting ( for a Melville fan). But it doesn't hold a candle to CLR James masterpiece: "Mariners, Renegades and Castaways: The Story of Herman Melville and World the We Live In". Although it may sound like I'm going off on a tangent, CLR James actually brings us back to that "total bastard" in charge of the ship through his reading of Captain Ahab as Melville's perfect characterization of Totalitarianism.

http://tashqueedagg.wordpress.com/2013/01/05/herman-melville-moby-dick-ahab-and-c-l-r-james/" rel="nofollow - http://tashqueedagg.wordpress.com/2013/01/05/herman-melville-moby-dick-ahab-and-c-l-r-james/

Although an academic work and not a Philbrickian page turner, the best recent book I've seen on America in the Pacific is Bruce Cumings: "Dominion from Sea to Sea: Pacific Ascendancy and American Power". Should be required reading. Cumings is an Asianist (Korea) and he brilliantly counters the Atlantic and landed frontier interpretations of history with a Pacific and marine interpretation.


Posted By: topgearskin
Date Posted: 11 Jan 2014 at 3:35pm
I got that for Christmas as well. Been saving it for travel but I've already had a start on it. I think it's very good.
I'm currently getting through "careless love" by Peter guralnick. It's a trivia fest for Elvis fans. "Last train to Memphis" was an education and this is part two.
I'd recommend both books.


Posted By: *lefty*
Date Posted: 09 Mar 2014 at 1:33pm
I just finished these this week. As someone who very interested in ossuaries, it was wonderful to find such amazing books on the subject. The author seems to have had special access to some locations and permission to set up lighting in others. I've been to a number of these spots, but there are so many more to see. 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0500251959/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0500251789/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i03?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 26 Mar 2014 at 1:24am
A customer of mine gave me this book on Monday, Work was put on the back burner yesterday.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Ht4tHL8sL.jpg

Stories from the 40,s about a young boy (he was 6 in 1948) growing up in one of Sheffields poorest areas to a working class family (they were typically working class at that time but we would consider it outright poverty by today's standards) The spoken dialect is written phonetically most of which has died out in Sheffield, all the old sayings brought back memories of how my Nan used to speak when i was a kid. Made all the more enjoyable because its set around the same locality as my work address albeit all the housing has gone replaced by international student accommodation mixed with small business. A fast lighthearted read but i really enjoyed it.



Posted By: mandel9000
Date Posted: 26 Mar 2014 at 10:47am


Bob Stanley's Yeah Yeah Yeah: The Story of Modern Pop. At 747 pages it's quite a long read, but it's broken down into short, well-written chapters that makes it easy to get through. I'm only 1/3 through and started reading while travelling, but I think I'll start over when I'm done and listen to the songs that are mentioned. 

With the scope Stanley has chosen, from when the first pop charts appeared in 1952 up until the launch of iTunes in 2000, every genre, sub-genre or musical development is discussed only briefly, but oh, all that fun trivia! I'm sure it will be very useful at my weekly pop quiz!


Posted By: redchris
Date Posted: 27 Mar 2014 at 3:30am


http://s1002.photobucket.com/user/redchris/media/Mobile%20Uploads/IQ84_zpsycvhgpjm.jpg.html" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 28 Mar 2014 at 1:51pm





Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 01 Jun 2014 at 7:03pm
Just finished this. What a great book. DVR was not only a great musician, but a social critic with an outstanding eye and a great sense of humor.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Mayor-MacDougal-Street-2013/dp/0306822164/ref=dp_ob_image_bk" rel="nofollow - http://www.amazon.com/The-Mayor-MacDougal-Street-2013/dp/0306822164/ref=dp_ob_image_bk


Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 20 Jun 2014 at 3:12pm
Brief excerpt from a soon to be released book--"Song of the Shirt"--on the relation between de-industrialization in Bengal and the rise of Manchester etc.

http://www.twnside.org.sg/title2/resurgence/2014/283-284/view1.htm" rel="nofollow - http://www.twnside.org.sg/title2/resurgence/2014/283-284/view1.htm

And followed up in the Guardian with the suggestion that China is doing the same today.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jun/20/britain-took-more-out-of-india" rel="nofollow - http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jun/20/britain-took-more-out-of-india


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 11 Jul 2014 at 3:06am
Eased myself into the day with Hewligans Haircut. A charming tale about Hewligan the only sane man in the loony bin. Enjoying "Care in the Community" Hewligan walks the streets hallucinating wildly. He sports a rather fetching haircut that contains a magic hole.
He manages to break the law somehow? on the run he goes through a Cubist Wavelength from an art dimension and into a repeating Warhol Wavelength. On they go through different dimensions: a West End musical, until they catch a double decker bus to Easter Island.




The rest of the day time well spent... Eleanor Coppola's first hand account of the making of Apocalypse Now.



In 1976 Francis Ford left Cali with his wife and kids to shoot Apocalypse Now. Eleanor has documented every detail of the creative process, months stretch into years and without spoiling it lets just say everything gets a little excessive and everyone gets emotional... Some great photo,s of the cast and crew on set in the Philippines.





Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 11 Jul 2014 at 4:53pm


Found this yesterday afternoon - haven't started it yet, but am looking forward to the stories behind what are considered genuinely 'American' items.  There is a portion on Levi's 501s of course, will be interesting to see what parts of the history are included as this was published in 1992.




Posted By: spork141
Date Posted: 11 Jul 2014 at 5:43pm
I'm reading the stand by Stephen King. Never read it and figured I had to. Just started it. So far so good


Posted By: ThisSunday
Date Posted: 11 Jul 2014 at 7:28pm
Alternating between re-reading William Gibson's Idoru and Dracula.

Also just started reading Judge Dredd which I never read growing up. Highly recommended. Much funnier than I expected.


Posted By: *lefty*
Date Posted: 15 Oct 2014 at 8:25am
Michael Pollan's Cooked contains a few tasty morsels that I've just digested, but it's mostly a rehashing of content from his previous books. I think he could have written The Omnivore's Dilemma and The Botany of Desire and left all the other writing on his desk.

I'm re-starting Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal after starting it once in an airport. 


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Posted By: Jeanfi_belgium
Date Posted: 16 Oct 2014 at 2:38am
I have almost 4 hours of commute each day...

So I read a lot

For the moment it's Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen confidential

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Jeanfi
From Belgium


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 8:48pm
I've been reading a number of books to Hank lately -- his favorite is Sesame Street :Bubbles --- which he calls 'SESSS-E BOB-BELLS BOB-BELLS'


I was hoping to go see David Sedaris with my wife next week, but it didn't work out for us to go -- anyhow I've been reading a few of the essays here and there from his latest 'Let's explore Diabetes with Owls'




Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 06 Mar 2015 at 1:03pm
Just started it yesterday so a long way to go but "The Last Days of Detroit" by Mark Binelli - a fascinating socio-historical-political account of the rise and fall and future of one of America's great cities.


Posted By: Duke Mantee
Date Posted: 08 Mar 2015 at 7:30am
Recently finished (for the third time) Umberto Eco's wonderous whodunit 'The Name of the Rose'. Even the parts that are unintelligible are entertaining and necessary.

Now enjoying Norman Davies' - 'Europe: A History', cited as being one of the least parochial or polarised histories written about the continent . . . thankfully it's proving to be just that.


Posted By: Denimetc
Date Posted: 08 Mar 2015 at 11:54am
Just finished the Zero History by William Gibson- It was bit of a struggle, never really got into it, but felt like it was a necessary part of modern denim folklore to get through.


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Too much Denim - too little time...


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 27 Mar 2015 at 1:52am
'The Free' by Willy Vlautin, I'm not that far in yet but so far it's a healthy dose of American Reality (rather than Dream). Highly readable.


Posted By: setterman
Date Posted: 02 Apr 2015 at 6:18am
Haven't read anything in a while.  Last night I downloaded and started on "Ghost! Field Journal of a Bird Dog".  Shoulda spent more time reading instead of laying in front of the TV this winter.  

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I got a rocket in my pocket and roll in my jeans


Posted By: Boise
Date Posted: 02 Apr 2015 at 7:05am
Just finished A Dance with Dragons. If anyone wants the 5 book set of Game of thrones I have it in epub and mobi format...will work with nook or kindle.  PM me with your email addy and I will send them.

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He's like a goddamn seagull.


Posted By: setterman
Date Posted: 22 Apr 2015 at 10:54am
"The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History".

Happy stuff.....


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I got a rocket in my pocket and roll in my jeans


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 22 Apr 2015 at 7:54pm
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/letter-from-oklahoma%20" rel="nofollow - http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/letter-from-oklahoma

i


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 14 May 2015 at 7:17am
'Young Skins' by Colin Barrett - a collection of contemporary short stories set in a small-town on the west coast of Ireland (well, the ones I've read so far have been) by a young Irish author. My words and not the back cover's by the way.

Really enjoying it - gritty and witty in equal measure with a dollop of cliched Irish charm thrown in. Thumbs up!


Posted By: likeacannon
Date Posted: 19 Jul 2015 at 7:48pm
I just started Charles Taylor's A Secular Age and am genuinely loving it, though at 876 pages it's gonna stake some cognitive elbow grease to get through it anytime soon. Any other armchair philosophers/Historians/Sociologists out there?


Posted By: Blood&Thunder
Date Posted: 01 Sep 2015 at 12:41pm
I'm about halfway through "Caravaggio:  A Life Sacred and Profane".  Very good read so far, if you are into art history.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 01 Sep 2015 at 1:26pm
Im part way through Acid Dreams "The complete social history of LSD"
Seems to be a very well researched highly detailed account quoting government files obtained through freedom of information.
Its pretty engaging s'far.


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 01 Sep 2015 at 1:31pm
Wittgenstein Jr by Lars Iyer - an odd, satirical account of a fictitious philosophy lecturer and his students at Cambridge University. Funny and thought-provoking.


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 01 Sep 2015 at 1:54pm
I just finished Beggars of Life, autobio by Jim Tully.  Those who enjoyed You Can't Win will like this.

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I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 01 Sep 2015 at 2:40pm
Klan-destine Relationships by Daryl Davis, a Black Man's Odyssey in the Ku Klux Klan

A strange & thought provoking story...


Posted By: TavisFrowny
Date Posted: 02 Sep 2015 at 8:17am
Read "The Grail Bird" by Tim Gallagher from 2006.  Ecological nonfiction about the presumed extinct Ivory Billed Woodpecker.  Well written and interesting.  Would highly recommend to anyone interested in this type of thing.   


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 11 Sep 2015 at 1:47am
'A Kestrel for a Knave' by Barry Hines, probably more familiar to most by its screenplay title, 'Kes' (adapted by Ken Loach).

I bet tha loves this un' Dobblo Oh.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 11 Sep 2015 at 2:56am
Damn right! is it written phonetically?
Did you have to tell Mrs Fried-San you had something in your eye to explain away the tears?

Ive just read 'Desert Solitaire' by Edward Abbey he's a curmudgeonly old grump.


Posted By: oomslokop
Date Posted: 28 Oct 2015 at 5:13am
the quran, by allah. not joking, i was raised a muslim, could read the arabic script to memorize some of the verses for praying (just reading it out loud in the original arabic without understanding the meaning also wins you brownie points), but now i'm reading it in a bilingual version (arabic-english). will need careful study of many commentaries to fully understand it though. i am an atheist but in a country where there is equal amount of islamic fundamentalism and islamophobia going around, i feel morally responsible to go back to the good book to try to get to/understand the root of things. 

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rakuten is entertainment


Posted By: likeacannon
Date Posted: 28 Oct 2015 at 9:29am
Bravo to you Oomslokop, many people wouldn't take the effort to understand other people or something as complex as a major religion. Clap If only more people could be like you and try to come from a place of understanding instead of just pushing ignorance. As someone who's livelihood is wrapped up in theological and philosophical issues like this, it makes me proud to be human when I hear of people trying to educate themselves on the most precious core commitments of others, so thank you.


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 28 Oct 2015 at 9:44am
Good on you ooms, although I didn't know Allah actually wrote it

I'll test you when you're finished, to see if you're a hafiz!


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 17 Nov 2015 at 4:31am
Just read Murakami's 'The Strange Library'. Does what it says on the tin in the typical style of the author and is nicely illustrated too. My only complaint is that it's very short but will fill a half-hour commute, doctor/dentist waiting-room slot.


Posted By: DorianGray
Date Posted: 27 Nov 2015 at 2:47pm
Maigret Books by Georges Simenon, startet with one i bought at the Train Station a couple of Weeks ago, now i am halfway trough the third, i think i am quite addicted.

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https://www.instagram.com/steffen101" rel="nofollow - Instagram


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 27 Nov 2015 at 3:39pm
I bought a paperback copy of the great gatsby from the 40s a few days back and am re-reading it in fits and starts.


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 27 Nov 2015 at 5:35pm
Welcome DorianGray, your biography isn't a bad read either.


Posted By: DorianGray
Date Posted: 28 Nov 2015 at 5:57am
Originally posted by Maynard Fried-San Maynard Fried-San wrote:

Welcome DorianGray, your biography isn't a bad read either.

Big smile It isn't indeed, big fan of the story although i am not that into the classics normally.


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https://www.instagram.com/steffen101" rel="nofollow - Instagram


Posted By: Blood&Thunder
Date Posted: 18 Dec 2015 at 3:05pm
Lawrence in Arabia.  Only about a quarter of the way through it so far but a very interesting read, not only about the life of T.E. Lawrence, but about some of the politics and events that shaped the middle east today.


Posted By: smoothsailor
Date Posted: 26 Jan 2016 at 12:14pm
just finished , the new tsar . Biography from Vladimir Poetin. interesting and scary. And a challenge for a dislectic

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dislectic


Posted By: leicadokyu
Date Posted: 26 Jan 2016 at 12:52pm
Originally posted by Ishmael Ishmael wrote:

^^ That sounds very very interesting. I need to check it out.

Currently I'm reading Murakami Haruki's "Shikisai o Motanai Tazaki Tsukuru to, Kare no Junrei no Toshi" or Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage. It's quite good so far. 

First time I've read one of his books in Japanese. Bit of a challenge for me. But I'm getting better at really enjoying Japanese lit by plowing through the kanji I'm not sure of, rather than obsessing over each sentence. 

Any Murakami fans out there? Ifyou haven't read his work I strongly suggest The Wind Up Bird Chronicle. 

A big fan of his work, my wife also. I was able to finish Kafka, Wind up Bird and Wild Sheep Chase. I like the fusion of reality and fantasy on his work, very avant-garde. I am currently reading Ragged Dick and I'm enjoying it. 


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Art is all about doing what you shouldn't - Nobuyoshi, Araki


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 26 Jan 2016 at 1:20pm
^ I'm reading Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki too now and thoroughly enjoying it (as expected).

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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: ThisSunday
Date Posted: 26 Jan 2016 at 2:26pm
I read Colorless a couple of summers ago and really dug it. I have all of his works that have been released stateside but still need to read 1Q84 and Kafka


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 26 Jan 2016 at 3:03pm
Infinite Jest - ~90%
5th book in the Dark Tower Series by Stephen King - ~50%
Distant Neighbors, a series of letters between Gary Snyder and Wendell Berry - ~30%


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I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: ThisSunday
Date Posted: 26 Jan 2016 at 3:17pm
From what I hear, you should stop reading the Dark Tower because it goes downhill


Posted By: leicadokyu
Date Posted: 26 Jan 2016 at 3:31pm
He is indeed remarkable. I am so amazed how creative his mind is that he was able to visualize something out of the norm. I guess its the culture that drives this creativity and this just show how depth the Japanese culture is. Imagine that they excel on almost every aspects of Art may it be with photography, denim making, pottery or novels. I am a big fan of their Art and just to share back in college in photography my references are Daido Moriyama, Eikoh Hosoe, and Jun Abe. They are the Murakami of photography and if you guys have time go check their amazing work. I apologize if i go out of topic on this one. Oh i almost forgot, Norwegian wood too is a good read and they even have created a movie out of this novel.

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Art is all about doing what you shouldn't - Nobuyoshi, Araki


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 26 Jan 2016 at 3:38pm
Originally posted by ThisSunday ThisSunday wrote:

From what I hear, you should stop reading the Dark Tower because it goes downhill

I've heard that as well, but I'm not sure I could stop without reading the ending now, even if it's bad.


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I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 27 Jan 2016 at 2:24am
I'm also reading 'Swallows and Amazons' by Arthur Ransome to my son. We're both enjoying it hugely (me for the second time).

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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: smoothsailor
Date Posted: 15 Feb 2016 at 7:33am
just finished ametora, how japan saved american style.
I didn't realize its such a big game. 


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dislectic


Posted By: Ishmael
Date Posted: 15 Feb 2016 at 7:44am
That book looks quite interesting. Did you like it?


Posted By: redchris
Date Posted: 15 Feb 2016 at 8:33am
Kudos to you Hollows, just started Infinite Jest again, about the 8th time.


Posted By: redchris
Date Posted: 15 Feb 2016 at 8:33am
That's the 8th time started. Yet to get past 2t%


Posted By: smoothsailor
Date Posted: 15 Feb 2016 at 12:36pm
Ishmael, I did like it. Its easy to read , even for a dialect like me. And its well put together chronology and a conclusion too. And it makes sense as well 

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dislectic


Posted By: Blood&Thunder
Date Posted: 16 Feb 2016 at 1:57pm
Just finished Bull Mountain by Brian Panowich.  Very good, quick, novel. 

Now a little ways into Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher.  Very entertaining read about Edward S. Curtis' life photographing and recording various Native American tribes and individuals.


Posted By: Cormacaroni
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 3:10pm
Read the Ametora on your rec, Smoothsailor- cheers! I lived through a fair amount of this but was oblivious to most of it. It was quite fascinating to see how all these brands that I've taken for granted got started. I was particularly interested in the close ties to magazines - how often mag gurus start their own lines. Lots of cross-pollination there. 


Posted By: cheapmuthafukr
Date Posted: 27 Feb 2016 at 8:50pm
engineering statics-thirteenth edition



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