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The Ye Olde Sayings Thread

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Topic: The Ye Olde Sayings Thread
Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Subject: The Ye Olde Sayings Thread
Date Posted: 13 Apr 2016 at 1:43pm
I like the evolution of language but i also like those charming old sayings of yesteryear.

Im sure cultural differences will play a strong part here, so old sayings? post them here...
I will get the ball a rolling.

The Dog Shelf = The floor (the shelf where one would keep ones dog)

Im in Fine Fettle = Im feeling good today

Im at end of my tether = Im very annoyed

Ankle Swingers = Long trousers that are too short (also see trousers at half mast)

Puddled = Mental illness

Cat lick = A quick wash

Deaf as a door nail = Hard of hearing

Tranklements = The paraphernalia carried around on ones person

... be it something your grandparents said? be it naval? be it regional?
Lets hear them?




Replies:
Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 13 Apr 2016 at 6:29pm
 common, and maybe not so old

higher than a cats ass - expensive  - usually 'gas went back up, i was across town boy it was higher than a cats ass.'

variant of that is -- 'cats ass' ;  'that's the cat's ass' : tip top, best, very cool.

finer than frog hair -- doing well

 




Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 13 Apr 2016 at 9:47pm
That's hillarious bob, its Dogs Bollocks here.

Its the Dogs Bollocks = Its the best

He's as bent as a dogs hind leg = A rather unsavoury character.

He's as straight as a die = An honest chap


Posted By: Duke Mantee
Date Posted: 13 Apr 2016 at 11:38pm
Haud yer wheesht = Be quiet
We're a' Jock Tamson's bairns = We are all God's children / we are all equal
A nod's as guid as a wink tae a blind horse = A gentle rebuke to someone not being clear on what they say
Lang may yer lum reek = A wish for a long and healthy life

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Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
https://instagram.com/duke_mantee/" rel="nofollow - Duke-a-gram


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 14 Apr 2016 at 1:35am
I was looking forward to your contribution Duke.

Skidaddle = Run away quickly

Sling thi 'ook (sling your hook) = Please go away

Cubby hole = A small cupboard

Flittin = Moving house

He dun't know whether e's on this earth or Fullers = Possible Meth user

Ropey (Im feeling a bit ropey) = Im hungover


Posted By: Flash
Date Posted: 14 Apr 2016 at 2:12am
What's the Crack ? - how are you

Yer head's lit - you are crazy

I'm away for a dander - I'm going for a walk

Take yer self off - go away


Posted By: Duke Mantee
Date Posted: 14 Apr 2016 at 3:28am
What's fur ye'll no go past ye - Que sera sera

In a slightly different aspect there are two sayings that are probably more Glaswegian than anything else and both use the word 'aye' in a negative and sarcastic way. These are usually used when someone is a bit of a blowhard or is boasting e.g.

If you're being told a preposterous story about some person or thing then the response would be 'Aye, right' so two positives making a negative;

Or if the braggart himself is telling you about some fantastic exploit then the response would be 'Did ye? Aye?' pretty much meaning 'no you didn't'




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Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
https://instagram.com/duke_mantee/" rel="nofollow - Duke-a-gram


Posted By: Majormajor
Date Posted: 14 Apr 2016 at 3:53am
Some more  (West)Yorkshire expressions:
 
"Ee, a can't thoyle t'brass for yon" - I could afford that, but it's too expensive for me...(often used in relation to Japanese Leather Jackets)....
 
"Don't be maunjy" - cheer up...
 
"Tha's nicked" - You are crazy....
 
These might not be Yorkshire, but we say them:
 
"Anklebiters" - children...
 
"balmpot" - fool...
 


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www.classicsoulcentral.com


Posted By: massivebonanza
Date Posted: 14 Apr 2016 at 5:55am
Fun thread Soul.

Some of you good Yorkshire folk may be familiar with the following soundbite but I'd ask that you don't name it as I pilfered it for prosperity from the site which has now been taken down - so as a result the audio is not mine. However it's too good to loose.

For the rest of you, see if you can figure any out. I'll post the text later if anyone is interested in this. 

I spent many a year in the town, so it's pretty clear, but if you're not from the UK or even just haven't spent any time up North some of them might be a giggle.

Track is private but you can play via the orange/white play symbol to the top left if you're not familiar with sound cloud. Recording begins at 0.04.

https://soundcloud.com/user-722767264/sayings/s-tEHS8" rel="nofollow - https://soundcloud.com/user-722767264/sayings/s-tEHS8


Posted By: Majormajor
Date Posted: 14 Apr 2016 at 6:44am
Originally posted by massivebonanza massivebonanza wrote:

Fun thread Soul.

Some of you good Yorkshire folk may be familiar with the following soundbite but I'd ask that you don't name it as I pilfered it for prosperity from the site which has now been taken down - so as a result the audio is not mine. However it's too good to loose.

For the rest of you, see if you can figure any out. I'll post the text later if anyone is interested in this. 

I spent many a year in the town, so it's pretty clear, but if you're not from the UK or even just haven't spent any time up North some of them might be a giggle.

Track is private but you can play via the orange/white play symbol to the top left if you're not familiar with sound cloud. Recording begins at 0.04.

https://soundcloud.com/user-722767264/sayings/s-tEHS8" rel="nofollow - https://soundcloud.com/user-722767264/sayings/s-tEHS8
 
Sounds like Wakefield or Barnsley - or somewhere in between - and it all sounded crystal clear to me. In fact it could have been me! LOLEmbarrassed


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www.classicsoulcentral.com


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 14 Apr 2016 at 1:23pm
My favourites so far
Originally posted by Duke Mantee Duke Mantee wrote:


A nod's as guid as a wink tae a blind horse = A gentle rebuke to someone not being clear on what they say


Genius^

Originally posted by Majormajor Majormajor wrote:


 "Ee, a can't thoyle t'brass for yon" - I could afford that, but it's too expensive for me...(often used in relation to Japanese Leather Jackets)....
 


Ne'er cast a clout till May be out = Don't remove your winter clothing until the May blossom falls.

I will give you a bunch of fives =  Im going to punch you in the face (also see knuckle-sandwich)

Gi'or lolloping abart on't setee = Would you please sit correctly on the sofa

Weshin = Laundry


Posted By: Majormajor
Date Posted: 14 Apr 2016 at 1:52pm
Sparrapart - a young person - sort of a Yorkshire version of Wipper Snapper....
 
Stop thi mytherin - calm down...
 
OW - Thee! - Excuse me, sir
 
Wis ta barn? - Where are you going, today.
 
Si ther - Look at that!
 
Yon - Over there..
 
Gus laik a whippet - He is quite fast
 
Eyup, partyface - I say, someone with large horn rimmed spectacles and a handlebar moustache has just entered the bar....


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www.classicsoulcentral.com


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 12:05pm
I need a _________ like a moose needs a hat rack = I have plenty of that thing, and I needn't acquire more

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I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: mr randal
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 12:21pm
Put a pin in it- be quiet ('40s)

The party shows in the face- someone has been indulging too much and it shows (modern, SoCal)

Even a screen door can slam- describing an outburst from an otherwise easygoing individual (southern, '50s?)

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http://www.instagram.com/jay_stitch" rel="nofollow - instagram


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 12:27pm
"Talk the hind legs off a donkey"
"Nineteen to the dozen"
"Two shakes of a lamb's tail"
"Shanks's pony"
"Bull in a china shop"
"A face like a wet weekend"
"Going to see a man about a dog"


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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 12:33pm
Corporation wine = Tap water
(context) mom can i have a drink? Yes of course dear, there is some corporation wine in the tap.

Pie-eyed = Stoner

Shit off a Shovel = Very fast indeed
(context) Did you see Usain Bolt run the 100m? Aye he were like shit off a shovel.


Posted By: Flash
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 12:35pm
cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey 


Posted By: Majormajor
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 1:18pm
Originally posted by Maynard Fried-San Maynard Fried-San wrote:

"
"Going to see a man about a dog"
 
A phrase with far too many connotations to discuss here.....Smile


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www.classicsoulcentral.com


Posted By: mr randal
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 5:19pm
Face like a wet weekend-

I like this one a lot!

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http://www.instagram.com/jay_stitch" rel="nofollow - instagram


Posted By: oomslokop
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 6:59pm
youse blokes don't know shit from clay!

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rakuten is entertainment


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 15 Apr 2016 at 9:28pm
^ I always heard - you don't know shit from shinola - mostly from easterners or veterans

'you got moxie kid.' Moxie : spunk ,determination, -- from the soda , if you can drink one and want a second ; '

'Mind your p's and q's ' -- be on your best behavior

''Sunday go to meeting(outfit) " -- your best clothes , even my non- church attending aunts and uncles would refer to dress clothes of any spade as 'Sunday go to meeting.'

'That's a horse of a different color' -- that's a different thing entirely, that won't do

'That dog won't hunt.' -- you're full of shit , you're caught

You're barking up the wrong tree - I don't care

Dont take any wooden nickels - be prudent

' Cruise the poo ' -- this one is very specific to Shawnee, OK . The main drag in town is 'Kickapoo' and the teenagers cruise it on Fridays and Saturdays . I worked at a summer camp near there and early into my first year had a , rather attractive girl I'd been eying me if I wanted to cruise the poo with her and some of her girlfriends -- needless to say my 13 year old face turned 80 shades of red ... And then a few hours later I sat in a parking lot while they smoked and we ate at Sonic .



Posted By: Dr_Heech
Date Posted: 17 Apr 2016 at 12:31pm
"It's better than a slap round the face with a wet fish" - It's better than nothing.

"You cant polish a turd" - That's the best you're going to make of it, so don't waste any more time.

"Are you talking to me, or you chewing a brick?" - Please be clear about what you are trying to convey, as I'm finding it difficult to understand you.






Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 17 Apr 2016 at 1:03pm
You cant make a silk purse out of a sow's ear = If your materials are cheap, your finished product will be shit.


Posted By: Flash
Date Posted: 17 Apr 2016 at 1:09pm
"if your granny had balls she'd have been your granda"   no idea what it means but remember my dad's old mate Fred always said it 

Edit .... found an explanation 

The saying illustrates the absurdity in operating in "ifs." The fact that it is so terribly important to you to engage in "ifs" instead of the reality of the current situation says much more about you then it does about anything else.


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 17 Apr 2016 at 1:29pm
"If ifs and buts were candy and nuts everyday would be Christmas."

'When God said brains they heard trains , and got upset because they weren't going anywhere."



Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 17 Apr 2016 at 1:55pm
Continuing the theme..,
"If ifs and ands were pots and pans, there'd be no need for tinkers".

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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 2:02am
Thats a new one for me^

I was born after decimalisation (hard to believe i know) but i remember as a young'un going to the village shops with my grandparents and they were still struggling to make the transition almost 10years later. I would be in the butchers shop having to count out the dosh from my nan's purse. They wasn't even that old, possibly late 60,s and they lived a further 17 years. Hard to believe in the days of foreign travel where you make the transition to another currency in just a few days.

Dosh terms from back when.
Nicker = Pound note
Bob = Shilling
Tanner = Six penny piece
Threpney bit (Thrupence) = Three pence piece
A'penie = Half penny

They saved their pre-decimal currency for years later expecting it to one day revert back.
"It'll never work"


Posted By: Mr Black
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 4:27am
Bit of hows yer father!= Slap & tickle

Gertcha cow son. = Get out of it, you son of a cow.
(I never thought anyone other than Chas n Dave said this, but I heard it muttered by an old east-end gent a while back)




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www.sidewinderapparel.co.uk


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 4:57am
As a kid growing up in the East End, my aunt (who, incidentally has a fantastic comedy name) used to say "Gertcha" to me all the time.

"Not the full shilling", was often directed at anyone with learning difficulties or mental health problems. Pre-PC and the era of 'understanding'.

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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: oomslokop
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 5:39am
this is not english (does it have to be english?) but in batavia (colonial tempo doeloe name for jakarta) the indos (halfbloods/mestizo) used to say "let's write a letter in english" and make a writing gesture with their hands when they wanted to take an afternoon nap. Sleepy

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rakuten is entertainment


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 6:07am
Originally posted by oomslokop oomslokop wrote:

(does it have to be english?)


Not at all, look at duke's posts or the majors come to that.


Posted By: Rivet Head
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 6:21am
I'd rather be an old woman's baby than a young woman's slave

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www.rivet-head.blogspot.com


Posted By: Mr Black
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 6:48am
Originally posted by oomslokop oomslokop wrote:

this is not english (does it have to be english?) but in batavia (colonial tempo doeloe name for jakarta) the indos (halfbloods/mestizo) used to say "let's write a letter in english" and make a writing gesture with their hands when they wanted to take an afternoon nap. Sleepy


What do you think are the roots of that saying?


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www.sidewinderapparel.co.uk


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 9:03am
A hard row to hoe -- a difficult set of circumstances

Axe to grind -- hard feelings / alterior motive


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 10:31am
She's too fond of dropping her handkerchief = Lady of loose morals/promiscuous

Credited to a bitch i mean bloke i know who credits it to some Shakespearean twaddle when ladies would purposefully drop a handkerchief for a nobleman to pick up and thus start a romantic relationship.






Posted By: Slimstraight
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 10:55am
I've always loved "Bob's your uncle".


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 11:31am
"Fur coat and no knickers" - someone who may or does look classy but has loose morals
"Champagne ideas and lemonade pockets" - a poor or skint person with ideas/tastes beyond their means
"Short arms and long pockets" - a tight person

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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: ihatebrianwilliams
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 12:02pm
I have always liked:
Quit going around your elbow to get to your thumb.  








Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 12:16pm
Yes that's good^

Im up and down like a bride's nightie

or

Im up and down like a dog at a fair

(context) unreasonable demands on ones time, when folks don't allow you more than 5mins to sit on the sofa.


Posted By: Flash
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 12:20pm
not sure if this one is a Northern Irish thing or not 
"thats all arse about face" - thats wrong or back to front  


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 1:39pm
Trying to think of some things my Lancashire parents would say.

Black as up chimney - dirty

Soft as me pocket - a compassionate person

Balm pot (or maybe barmpot?) - someone daft

Neither use nor ornament - someone or something that was useless





Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 1:56pm
"Soft as me pocket" that's just lovely, im introducing it into my lingo starting tomorrow.


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 18 Apr 2016 at 8:33pm
Originally posted by Double 0 Soul Double 0 Soul wrote:

"Soft as me pocket" that's just lovely, im introducing it into my lingo starting tomorrow.

Nice, isn't it. I think back fondly to hearing my mother say that & other strange stuff. Hopefully I can remember some other unusual sayings of hers.


Posted By: smoothsailor
Date Posted: 19 Apr 2016 at 12:01am
isn't "daft" lingo?

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dislectic


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 19 Apr 2016 at 1:16am
"Well, I'll go to the foot of our stairs!" - an expression of surprise or incredulity - I'll be damned!

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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 19 Apr 2016 at 8:24am
Originally posted by smoothsailor smoothsailor wrote:

isn't "daft" lingo?


Daft is a real word.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 19 Apr 2016 at 10:13am
He's as daft as a brush that smoothsailor Wink


Posted By: Duke Mantee
Date Posted: 19 Apr 2016 at 11:15am
Fuck this for a game of soldiers = bugger this for a lark

(Double 0 will elucidate)

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Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
https://instagram.com/duke_mantee/" rel="nofollow - Duke-a-gram


Posted By: smoothsailor
Date Posted: 19 Apr 2016 at 11:52am
this thread is not for dutch dislectics. Give a shout when there's pictures

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dislectic


Posted By: mr randal
Date Posted: 19 Apr 2016 at 12:41pm
Fighting with a tar patch.

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http://www.instagram.com/jay_stitch" rel="nofollow - instagram


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 19 Apr 2016 at 12:45pm
Wink


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2016 at 4:48pm
'Ave some of http://www.thebrits.com/businesses/slang-meanings/" rel="nofollow - this

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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: badseed
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2016 at 8:13pm
Originally posted by oomslokop oomslokop wrote:

this is not english (does it have to be english?) but in batavia (colonial tempo doeloe name for jakarta) the indos (halfbloods/mestizo) used to say "let's write a letter in english" and make a writing gesture with their hands when they wanted to take an afternoon nap. Sleepy

Amazing,my father-in-law is Chinese and uses the same to mean take a crap.


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And the senses being dulled are mine


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 29 Apr 2016 at 8:53pm
"Stuck like shit to a blanket" - When something is hard to clean off.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 30 Apr 2016 at 12:31am
He dun't know whether he's going for a shit o' haircut = Incredibly busy with numerous tasks to effectuate.


Posted By: oomslokop
Date Posted: 30 Apr 2016 at 8:08pm
Originally posted by badseed badseed wrote:

Originally posted by oomslokop oomslokop wrote:

this is not english (does it have to be english?) but in batavia (colonial tempo doeloe name for jakarta) the indos (halfbloods/mestizo) used to say "let's write a letter in english" and make a writing gesture with their hands when they wanted to take an afternoon nap. Sleepy

Amazing,my father-in-law is Chinese and uses the same to mean take a crap.

very interesting. (and this also in response to mr black's earlier inquiry) one of the sources where i've seen that expression used is in e. breton de nijs' classic indies/tempo doeloe novel 'faded portraits', set in mid-19th century batavia. the guy who used that expression all the time in the book was the patriarch of the de pauly family, one uncle... chen!—a half chinese, half french indo/mestizo! could it be that the expression has its origins in a chinese expression for everything that gives one a lot of pleasure (taking a nap, a dump)? 


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rakuten is entertainment


Posted By: badseed
Date Posted: 30 Apr 2016 at 10:34pm
Good question.

My thinking was that compared to beautiful Chinese calligraphy the English language looked like shit.

Your theory does sound more refined.

I will offer your explanation when asked.

My daughter has somehow started using "send a letter to the Queen" for the same situation. I am very proud.


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And the senses being dulled are mine


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 01 May 2016 at 12:57am
On' Blink = Television set keeps going off (turned back on with a thump)

On' Tick = Television set is rented, Radio Rentals would tick your hire agreement every week when you pay your bill, also see On' Never Never (you never own it out right)


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 03 May 2016 at 12:56pm
Pie Crust promise = Easily broken

A gnats cock = A very tiny measurement indeed (microns)

Rough as a bears arse = Poorly made

A load of tripe = A false statement (also see Codswallop)


Posted By: Mr Black
Date Posted: 03 May 2016 at 2:51pm
Flat as a witches tit.

This is a term an old boss of mind used to use. Ironically she was a bit of a witch herself but with pendulous old-lady boobs.

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www.sidewinderapparel.co.uk


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 10 Jun 2016 at 10:45pm
'yankee '  --  used by an older self proclaimed southern belle I know to describe unsweetened iced tea, i am assuming not only is this because the farther north you go the less sweet the tea is (multiple wait staff in Nebraska would just hand you a sugar shaker and un-sweetened iced tea as though that some how was the same as sweet tea-- unacceptable!)  but also to describe how , from a southerners perspective, some people from the north are much less 'sweet' in their disposition. 

'MY! Well,pin a rose on your nose! ' -- big deal, no one cares

'the 64,000$ question' -- the crux, the point of whats being shared

 i don't know that this is an 'old saying' , but you're all familiar with certain acronyms like fubar and snafu --- i've been introduced to one at work by older employees where I work --- on the side of their tool boxes is an acronym they'll point to either in jest, or to spite whomever they directly report to :

KMAICR -- 'Kiss my ass i can retire.'

again, not an 'old' saying --- but in the vain of things I think.








Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 18 Jun 2016 at 11:38am
Snakes Alive! - and/or - Great Snakes! -- my goodness .


Posted By: Majormajor
Date Posted: 18 Jun 2016 at 2:53pm
"Brassic" - means you have no brass - i.e money.
 
So if you are skint in Yorkshire, you are "brassic"
 
Or your colleague could simply exclaim "tha's got bugger all"......


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www.classicsoulcentral.com


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 18 Jun 2016 at 4:09pm
Actually 'Brassic' doesn't refer to brass. It's rhyming slang - Boracic Lint = Skint

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boracic_lint" rel="nofollow - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boracic_lint


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 2:15am
We've strayed into Cockney Rhyming slang now - my home territory. Gertcha!!!

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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: Majormajor
Date Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 3:37am
Originally posted by CSL CSL wrote:

Actually 'Brassic' doesn't refer to brass. It's rhyming slang - Boracic Lint = Skint

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boracic_lint" rel="nofollow - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boracic_lint
 
That's cool.
 
I guess we took it a stage further by using just "brass" to mean money - i.e. "Where there's muck, there's brass"...


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www.classicsoulcentral.com


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 8:27am
Right. My parents were northern. They'd often say "where there's muck ,there's money".


Posted By: Majormajor
Date Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 11:20am
Originally posted by CSL CSL wrote:

Right. My parents were northern. They'd often say "where there's muck ,there's money".
 
Where in the north were they from, CSL?
 
The language can change within 5 miles or so round here - and the Pennines make a huge difference too.


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www.classicsoulcentral.com


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 3:11pm
MM, Mum was from Preston, Dad was from Blackpool. I know it's a bit different from the Yorkshire dialect.


Posted By: BAD
Date Posted: 25 Jun 2016 at 9:10pm
Jeezum Crow - How rural Vermonters express shock, dismay, surprise, and just about any other emotion which would lead someone to wish to say the lords name in vain.

Always liked this too:



Posted By: redchris
Date Posted: 23 Dec 2016 at 2:48am
Originally posted by Maynard Fried-San Maynard Fried-San wrote:

We've strayed into Cockney Rhyming slang now - my home territory. Gertcha!!!

Did you see Chas n Dave's Christmas special from '82 on Weds night mate ?


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 23 Dec 2016 at 10:44am
Wish we could get that here in the States.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 23 Dec 2016 at 10:51am
Here you go CSL Ive watched it for the last few years.





Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 23 Dec 2016 at 10:52am
Thank you! I will hook this up to the TV monitor today.


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 23 Dec 2016 at 2:59pm
Thoroughly enjoyed that, 00. Thanks!


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 19 Nov 2017 at 8:05pm
Shitting in tall cotton - doing well , especially financially


Posted By: Leroy Strauss
Date Posted: 19 Nov 2017 at 9:07pm
Bullteats! I thought these sayings were supposed to be old!


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 20 Nov 2017 at 4:59am
I'll have your guts for garters! - Moderate threat from childhood


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 20 Nov 2017 at 6:06am
"If I don't see you through the week, I'll see you through the window"
My dad and uncles always used to say this when I was a kid. I assume it just meant they'd catch up with you again at some unspecified future time.



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Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: Duke
Date Posted: 14 Feb 2019 at 2:47am
You’ll have had your tea then?

Basically it means you’re welcome but don’t expect to be fed.

Apparently the English think it’s Scottish which is correct in the context that ‘howay man’ is English ...


Posted By: BlueTrain
Date Posted: 23 Jul 2019 at 1:16pm
You can't always rely on an old saying.
 
"He who hesitates is lost."
 
But "Look before you leap."
 
I used to live in the country and one very curious word I heard was "whopper-jawed." Not quite sure what it means; maybe "bent out of shape."
 
My late father-in-law would occasionally use the exclamation "Gosh all fishhooks," one of his milder ones. But I once heard it in a pre-war movie.



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