Print Page | Close Window

Vintage Interior

Printed From: denimbro
Category: Denimbro
Forum Name: Life aside from denim
Forum Description: incidental
URL: http://www.denimbro.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=2779
Printed Date: 18 Nov 2019 at 1:40pm
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 11.10 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: Vintage Interior
Posted By: hollows
Subject: Vintage Interior
Date Posted: 16 Aug 2015 at 10:37am
This whole subject is currently filed under "no spare time" for me, but I'm very interested in some day learning to do some basic re-wiring and (wear-respectful) restoration on early 20th century electronics (particularly fans and lamps).

Anyone into this kind of thing care to suggest resources?  There's the AFCA forums for fans, but I've yet to find a similar resource for early industrial lamps.  My current (haw) knowledge of electronics and wiring is currently nil.

I'm also a huge fan of Toledo stools and chairs, and have a small collection going, so maybe this thread can be a place to discuss old housewares-type-stuff in general?  Hoping there's some other interested bros.


-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .



Replies:
Posted By: Happy Hooligan
Date Posted: 16 Aug 2015 at 11:25am
I'm going to be re-wiring some old singer industrial sewing lamps this week.  I've done a few old lamps and fans.   It's pretty easy.  White on white and black on black.   Most didn't have a ground.   The bigger issue is the motors on fans.   Most are sealed and you have to break them to get in to oil them.   Old clocks are the same.  I've done a few.  You have to drill into it, and oil then solder the hole and rewire. 

There's about 3 places I've found that sell vintage (new wire) and the like.   I just usually cut down a cheap extension cord and use that, but I'm not going for show quality things, just things I can use.    


-------------
http://www.MachineCollector.com" rel="nofollow - http://www.MachineCollector.com
http://www.DAEdenim.com" rel="nofollow - http://www.DAEdenim.com


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 24 Aug 2015 at 10:34am
Here's a few of my favorite bits around the shop...



Early Toledo stool, this hasa a threaded rod for height adjustment which I haven't seen often.  Feet are missing but replaced with some leather bits to keep the floor safe-ish.



Old Dietz mechanic's light, super bright spotlight on casters.  Not super useful but very cool.



'30s GE whiz with brass blades.  Arrived this morning and runs like a dream!



And my trusty Toledo chair, upon which I now sit.  Beautiful, strong, and super comfortable.  


-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 11 Nov 2015 at 10:22pm
Doesn't seem like I caught much bro interest with this thread, but in case there are any silent appreciators, Clutch has a good special on industrial interiors that features some really beautiful storefronts in japan:

http://www.lightningclutch.com/Industorial-Style.html" rel="nofollow - http://www.lightningclutch.com/Industorial-Style.html


-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: Bob Dale
Date Posted: 23 Dec 2015 at 5:26am
certainly interested, though I have nothing to contribute.

My appreciation for old and or 'dead' things runs deep.

If you can get a copy of 'the better homes and gardens handyman book' it has a pretty general intro to re-wiring if i am remembering correctly. and a ton of other valuable information in that vein.  Some of it is outdated but the bulk of it timeproof.  They're fairly ubiquitous, truth be told I probably have 3 in storage.
I'll poke around and if I find a copy I'll send it North to you.



Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 17 Feb 2019 at 10:00pm
Some of the lamp family, circa 1910-1930ish










-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 18 Feb 2019 at 12:32am
Model 1227 c1938 Anglepoise (Herbert Terry & Sons) by George Carwardine



Original everything even down to the grommets, it has only had a sympathetic re-wire

British lamp design at its very finest
Its sat on top of my mid-century wallnut and teak sideboard by Gunther Hoffstead for Uniflex


Posted By: Duke
Date Posted: 18 Feb 2019 at 3:15am
This thread is one that could demonstrate the beauty of antique furnishings, and certainly something I love, but it’s not something I can contribute to practically (my only ‘vintage’ items are 30 year old Tolomeo lamps) other than post ‘stuff wot I like’ ... that Uniflex sideboard for example


Posted By: EaseDownTheRoad
Date Posted: 18 Feb 2019 at 3:42am
I'm a sucker for all things mid century  and i must agree with Duke, that sideboard looks like a humdinger.
What are the legs like 00?

Anyone on here seen the 'Infinite Space' doc about the architect John Lautner?

If not it is well worth a watch, a lot of his work will be recognisable to any avid movie fans as his houses have appeared in 'The Big Lebowski', 'A Single Man' and 'Diamonds Are Forever.






Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 18 Feb 2019 at 6:55am
Originally posted by EaseDownTheRoad EaseDownTheRoad wrote:

I'm a sucker for all things mid century  and i must agree with Duke, that sideboard looks like a humdinger.
What are the legs like 00?


 



Posted By: Mr Black
Date Posted: 18 Feb 2019 at 9:02am
That's lovely. You have a beautiful pair of legs there.


-------------
www.sidewinderapparel.co.uk


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 18 Feb 2019 at 10:14am
Very nice stuff Double0, I'm grateful that Danish/mid-century isn't my thing, cause holy cow does it ever get expensive. I like looking at it though!

When I was renting, I always felt a bit reserved about getting too comfortable in one place, but my interest in nesting has exploded since buying my first house about a year and a half ago, and while I know that it can be a pernicious black hole of consumption, I do find that having a comfortable and beautiful space improves the quality of both work and rest. 

Luckily I enjoy just about every aspect of the process, I get nice lessons in the history of industries and designers as I go about researching, I get the thrill of the hunt, and a good deal of philosophical reflection on the nature of beauty/aesthetics/mood/atsmosphere/personal taste, and for me at least it's less about coveting particular objects (though there is certainly some of that) and more about pursuing suitability. It's quite nice to enshrine the bits and pieces of daily life in specific, carefully selected ways throughout the built environment. It seems to encourage better habits and healthy routines, which can be a big struggle for the self-employed.

And if ya read all that babble, treat yourself to a look at another lovely early 1900s lamp (otherwise avert your eyes).





-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 18 Feb 2019 at 10:29pm
Originally posted by EaseDownTheRoad EaseDownTheRoad wrote:

I'm a sucker for all things mid century  and i must agree with Duke, that sideboard looks like a humdinger.
What are the legs like 00?

Anyone on here seen the 'Infinite Space' doc about the architect John Lautner?

If not it is well worth a watch, a lot of his work will be recognisable to any avid movie fans as his houses have appeared in 'The Big Lebowski', 'A Single Man' and 'Diamonds Are Forever.





I thoroughly enjoyed this, but it's hard for me to think of his creations as living spaces. The amount of wealth needed to have a home like that is inconceivable to me. I really love a lot of his concepts and I'd love to see them adapted to a more moderate/practical scale. It's fun to imagine a world where (less extravagant but kindred) spaces like that are the norm, rather than being reserved for a wealthy few.


-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: EaseDownTheRoad
Date Posted: 19 Feb 2019 at 2:14am
Originally posted by Double 0 Soul Double 0 Soul wrote:

Originally posted by EaseDownTheRoad EaseDownTheRoad wrote:

I'm a sucker for all things mid century  and i must agree with Duke, that sideboard looks like a humdinger.
What are the legs like 00?


 


chers 00, that's a nice set of pins.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 19 Feb 2019 at 4:06am
Originally posted by hollows hollows wrote:

Very nice stuff Double0, I'm grateful that Danish/mid-century isn't my thing, cause holy cow does it ever get expensive. I like looking at it though!


Re- mid-century furniture...up to and around 2000 you couldn't give it away!  even vintage/reclamation/salvage didn't stock it because the furniture could often be large and the profit could be so very small, even 'The British Heart Foundation' (other charity shops are available) would turn their noses up at it.

Its not just the relatively recent appreciation for mid-century which has bumped up the prices its also availability thanks to the Internet along with cheap shipping... its fucked with the pricing!
Sheffield was historically working class therefor the folks buying furniture would often buy no frills but solid, best quality they could afford and built to last, they would look after it and keep said furniture for their entire life, if it was broken they would mend it, they would never throw it away.

Up to 2000 the folks who bought mid-century to furnish their houses when they were in their 20's would now be approaching their 80's, kids left home, grand kids at university downsizing, no space ect, you could pick it up for next to nowt, plus the dealers selling it weren't exactly Internet savvy (not many of us were back then) so the prices were kept affordable, you wasn't in direct competition with a large often wealthier market place.
We have a large antiques quarter in Sheffield (its a grand day out) I used to enjoy vintage furniture shopping because you needed a keen eye for design and a bit of creative flair to make things work in the space you have, now internet sites like Vinteriors does all this for you, all you need is a fat wallet a tape measure and an i-pad.


Posted By: denimsince65
Date Posted: 19 Feb 2019 at 6:47am
A very cool piece, OO.

Congrats on the buy.

Easiest way to search for similar pieces is to google Uniflex

-------------
www.wabashtees.com


Posted By: Duke
Date Posted: 19 Feb 2019 at 7:03am
Originally posted by EaseDownTheRoad EaseDownTheRoad wrote:

I'm a sucker for all things mid century  and i must agree with Duke, that sideboard looks like a humdinger.
What are the legs like 00?

Anyone on here seen the 'Infinite Space' doc about the architect John Lautner?

If not it is well worth a watch, a lot of his work will be recognisable to any avid movie fans as his houses have appeared in 'The Big Lebowski', 'A Single Man' and 'Diamonds Are Forever.







I’m not a big fan of how architects are lauded


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 19 Feb 2019 at 9:57am
I have quite a few E.D.L engineers lamps at work, im not sure what EDL stands for but im certain its not the English Defence League.


This one is attatched to my Boxford lathe, i have numerous sizes and they date from the 1950's through to the 1970's.

Over the last few years with the fashion for 'Industrial interiors' they are being restored and often command more £££ than the machines which they are attached to.

http://www.brunells.co.uk/stock/industrial-edl-lathe-light/" rel="nofollow - E.D.L Lathe Light

They do look quite effective but the market for these is folks who don't have to get their hands dirty to make a living rather than folks like me who have a much less romantic notion of the Industrial look.



Posted By: Duke
Date Posted: 19 Feb 2019 at 12:16pm
Electrodeless Discharge Lamps? I really don’t know but the EDL company has been on the go probably about 100 years or so (I know their modern products) and coincidentally that was about the period the electrodeless discharge lamp was becoming a modern idea - Nikola Tesla patented some associated work along those lines late in the 19th century - so perhaps they took their cue from that ... or more likely it’ll be the first initial of the 3 founding partners


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 19 Feb 2019 at 12:39pm
Thanks Duke, that's probably the best explanation i'll get today.. They can only take a rediculously low wattage bulb.

While i'm on a roll... i have an old (possible 60's era) oxblood lowback leather sofa and chair which used to be in the Managing Directors office of a company which i used to do some work for. This was back in the days when the MD would have a proper furnished office with deep pile carpets, humidor and drinks globe. When he retired 20yrs ago he asked if i would like it...well i never look a gift horse in the mouth.
Over the years the deep ox blood on the arms has worn away to a mid red where folks have been sat or my kid has been scrawming around. Ive been thinking about rubbing some black boot polish into the leather like folks did with cherry red DM's but i wouldn't want the boot polish to transfer onto peoples clothes, or worst still... my clothes

Any suggestions?


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 19 Feb 2019 at 3:05pm
I think the EDL lights are simply LED lights in disguise (no dyslexia jokes here). I’d try some dark brown polish on the sofa rather than the black, on a small test area, just rub it in well over a day or so then see how it goes, I think it’ll be fine once dry and your clothes will be unscathed.

-------------
Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: Foxy
Date Posted: 20 Feb 2019 at 2:44am
here is our late 1940's Sintrax coffee maker...


and our 1920's ceiling lamp...




Posted By: killer b
Date Posted: 20 Feb 2019 at 3:03am
This is my favourite bit of MCM, by John & Sylvia Reid for Stag, 1950s I think. 




Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 20 Feb 2019 at 6:43am
My work toaster..
1970's Dualit, from when the brand first started to appear in J.Lewis, Fortnum & Mason ect..
After nearly 50yrs it still works perfectly, the polar opposite of modern Dualit's, if you look carefully you can see some Warehouse in the reflection Big smile


To the left is a 1960's era Pifco 'Flying Saucer' fan heater, Made in Holland and still works a charm, although not very cost efficient it looks great hung up in my office.

...of course i spread butter with hollow-wear when you have a silversmith on the street.. who wouldn't?


Posted By: killer b
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 2:47am
... I also picked up this mid century design classic for peanuts yesterday. I needed a wall clock too...




Posted By: HP Sauce
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 5:57am
^
Such a wonderful find.



-------------
HP Sauce


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 11:08am
Nice killer! where's it going?

At the other end of the design spectrum... ive been trying to track down a vintage Braun wall clock for the kitchen without paying stupid ebay money. If you ever find one at the boot sales...buy it for me, i'll make it worth your while.

This kind of thing

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjCqd_Gwc3gAhU7RxUIHedEAVMQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.pinterest.com%2Fpin%2F307792955762053476%2F&psig=AOvVaw0kX-ta4SwNVUUqVxeX2LRb&ust=1550861978004634" rel="nofollow">Image result for VINTAGE BRAUN CLOCK



Posted By: killer b
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 11:17am


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 11:21am
Wicked! nearly as cool as Frequencies


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 11:24am
Very nice Neal, here’s my kitchen clock that’s been telling me I’m late for work for circa 20 yrs.


-------------
Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 11:32am
Tha'ts pretty cool!


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 7:47pm
Great stuff all around but I think I'm most impressed by a still-functioning toaster from the 70s! That's fantastic. I've never had a toaster that worked well beyond about 5 years. Very frustrating for such a seemingly-simple appliance. We put a man on the moon for pete's sake...

-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: CSL
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 10:16pm
Here's a beauty. Not mine, unfortunately.


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 10:40pm
When i used to stop over at my nan and grandad's house, we used to sit on the hearth in the dinning room in front of an open fire and cook toast using a toasting fork made from wrought iron, this kind of thing..

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwituPHn287gAhWhxYUKHd7zD24QjRx6BAgBEAU&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.castinstyle.co.uk%2Fproduct.php%2F2062%2Ftoasting-fork&psig=AOvVaw2hZkvrMsnkKECWOphaFFYF&ust=1550903457340227" rel="nofollow">Image result for toasting fork

This would have been around 1980 and they didn't even have toaster (they might have had a grill over the cooker) according to my memory that was the best buttered toast in the world!


Posted By: killer b
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 11:31pm
We used to toast over an open fire with a fork when we were kids too, it's so much nicer than any other way...


Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 21 Feb 2019 at 11:46pm
Now that you mention it, the few times I've had toast cooked on a campfire in my life were very memorable and delicious.

I recently got a wood stove in my workspace, maybe I need a toasting fork!


-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 22 Feb 2019 at 12:36am
I never had a toaster until I moved away from home as a student. First my parents had an eye-level grill on a Parkinson-Cowan gas cooker. When I was about 16 they got a fancy new kitchen with twin work surface Gaggenau grills sitting over a bed of coals and we made toast on one of those, the other was for grilling meat.

I bought a Dualit in about 1993/94, which lasted until about 2009 and I bought another, which is still going. I’d rather have one of those lovely 70s models though.

-------------
Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 22 Feb 2019 at 2:05am
Ive never replaced the heating elements in the 70's Dualit but i'm pretty sure its the same fitting as the modern ones, theoretically it should be a toaster for life.

Originally posted by hollows hollows wrote:

I recently got a wood stove in my workspace, maybe I need a toasting fork!


I bought some silver birch logs recently.. they burn super clean and crazy hot, perfect for toast.
When i used to cook on the fire with my nan that would have been a coal fire, in fact their hot water supply would have been coal fired too... good ol'days.


Posted By: smoothsailor
Date Posted: 23 Feb 2019 at 1:07pm
a vintage mini bar, that I use in my shop for my xerox machine.

and a roll desk that I use at my station, for my machines and such.
I tattooed a furniture dealer for the the desk. And coincidently I found the same one again a few weeks later at an other vintage furniture place. So now I have 2 stations in my shop with the same desk.



-------------
dislectic


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 02 Mar 2019 at 11:26am
I don't think hollows will mind if we stretch to the exterior...

Back in the late 90's one of my customers, a foundry called C.F.Fieldsend & Co was closing down, it has now been redeveloped into flats (of course it has)
I bought their old 1940's era 'Clocking In' machine from the canteen which i fully restored and sold it on to a friend of mine for his hallway (he still has it) i also bought all of their (60+ in total) old crucible pots, some had been used and were covered in molten metal but most were unused, i paid £200 for the lot.
They are made of clay-graphite to hold the heat and resist cracking, i drilled a hole in the bottom of each crucible pot and sealed the inside with a non-toxic bitumen type sealer and sold them on for £20each as 'industrial garden planters' this was in the pre-internet days so i had a sign in the Post Office window.
I kept the pots which were covered in metal/slag for their character, they were lovely! but they had a strong whiff of amine so i left them outside, they rusted and eventually i threw them in the skip.
20+ years later.... this is my last (albeit unused) crucible, they date from the 1960's




Posted By: apap
Date Posted: 02 Mar 2019 at 4:28pm
I'm enjoying this thread quite a bit so here's a couple clocks I have.  The GE is fairly common; I picked it up at an auction about 20 years ago.  The Simplex is an unusual vermillion red that I haven't seen elsewhere.  My daughter has it in her room.  

https://flic.kr/p/2dBw4vT" rel="nofollow"> https://flic.kr/p/2dBw4vT" rel="nofollow - IMG_0368 by https://www.flickr.com/photos/100771083@N07/" rel="nofollow - ap ap , on Flickr

https://flic.kr/p/2dBw4zR" rel="nofollow"> https://flic.kr/p/2dBw4zR" rel="nofollow - IMG_0370 by https://www.flickr.com/photos/100771083@N07/" rel="nofollow - ap ap , on Flickr


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 03 Mar 2019 at 1:56am
More from exterior...
The last 8 houses in our terrace (ours being the end) all have a large, chamfered, 3 intersecting circle 'venn diagram' style design carved into the stone lintels above all of the windows, doors, and gennel. Ive had a look on the Internet regarding what this design relates to, there are numerous explanations from The Occult to Borromean to Led Zeppelin but nothing as to why they would be carved into the stonework of Victorian terrace houses which tended to be functional rather than ornate.
If its just a 'masons mark' and he only worked on these 8 houses, why the heck is it so large? no other houses in the nearby streets have them, not even the villa's.
If anybody has a better explanation i would be interested in hearing your musings...

Anyhow.. back to the thread at hand.. i found some Victorian iron bench ends which have the same design cast in and thought that they would mirror the lintels perfectly.


The legs have been bead-blasted and repainted and it's had a new oak seat and backrest, with the 3circles design routered through and chamfered.



Posted By: Duke
Date Posted: 03 Mar 2019 at 3:25am
You’ll know it’s commonly called a Trefoil - but it’s definitely not a mason’s mark although I couldn’t easily say why only a select number of houses have it. Perhaps as you suggest there were a couple of masons working in the construction of the houses and one did an extra bit of carving and the other got paid the same regardless?


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 03 Mar 2019 at 3:44am
Or maybe they sacked him after the first 8 houses because he was fannying around with the details when the brickies wanted to get to the boozer...

These be they


..all the other lintels in the street are just a stone slab, they don't even have the beveling.


Posted By: Duke
Date Posted: 03 Mar 2019 at 4:03am
Same as construction now - start out with good intent (no, not really) and then make every effort to ignore the contract and maximise profit


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 03 Mar 2019 at 4:09am
Don't forget apply for planning permission under the guise of 'affordable family housing' without any intention of building such


Posted By: Duke
Date Posted: 03 Mar 2019 at 4:50am


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 06 Mar 2019 at 11:23am
Back around 2000 a friend of mine was fitting out his narrowboat, he bought some 30's/40's era flip down seats from a GP's surgery which was having a re-fit.
Lovely things, beautiful brassware, mahogony furniture and red leather seating, although it had seen much better days...
I stripped the old woodwork away and had the brassware re-polished, i re-furnished them with 1.5" waney edge oak seating, they looked perfect in his narrowboat, flipping up out of the way when not in use.

The deal was, i did the restoration work in exchange for all the remaining seating.

I never made use of them at the old address because the old barn was Grade II listed, the external courtyard walls were also listed being attatched to the barn (the heritage nerds don't take too kindly) Ive saved these bloody things for nearly 20years and i still don't really have a suitable external wall to support seating.

You'll have to use your imagination with this one...
The 2x brass castings in the middle are what attach to the wall/vertical surface, the 2x brass castings on the outside are what support the seat.



If you imagine the 2x pieces of mahogony screwed to the wall and a piece of timber screwed through the 6x holes to make a seat.


In the horizontal/seating position it would look like this.. obviously with a seat on top

To neatly flip the seat up into the vertical possition you just pull it towards yourself which moves the peg down the slide and they lock perfectly upright.
Lovely simple mechanism.


Ive even kept the original brass fixtures and fittings

...



Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 06 Mar 2019 at 12:16pm
While i'm at it... more nostalgia

Here's my 1970's era 'embossed'  http://www.kzwp.com/lyons1/lyonsmaidlogo.htm" rel="nofollow - Lyons Maid tin sign which ive framed and screwed to the garden fence.
The later versions wern't embossed, minor design changes through the decades ect...

A design classic of modern childrens advertising.


Until recently i also owned the late 70's - early 80's 'Walls' ice cream tin sign with the two children, girl wearing Clarks sandals, boy in patched jeans and blue pumps.
I gave it away to the 'Man n' Van' who helped us move as part payment...
I never bothered framing it... Walls ice cream was awful! almost as bad as Mr.Whippy



Posted By: hollows
Date Posted: 06 Mar 2019 at 1:45pm
I absolutely love that flip seating hardware. Very beautiful stuff and well-designed. 

They remind me a bit of the "swing stool" seating used in a lot of cafeteria-style tables (and prisons) in the US in the 20s:






-------------
I make things out of http://www.hollowsleather.com" rel="nofollow - leather .


Posted By: Double 0 Soul
Date Posted: 19 Mar 2019 at 12:25pm
The black version of the (previously mentioned) http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Braun-Wall-Clock-Dieter-Rams-Design-No-4833-1979-Made-In-Germany/273765863855?hash=item3fbdb791af:g:8pgAAOSwR2Zcjl-3&frcectupt=true" rel="nofollow - Braun has just been listed on fleabay, dagnabbit! £200 is too rich for my pocket




Posted By: Maynard Fried-San
Date Posted: 19 Mar 2019 at 1:53pm
Originally posted by hollows hollows wrote:

I absolutely love that flip seating hardware. Very beautiful stuff and well-designed. 

They remind me a bit of the "swing stool" seating used in a lot of cafeteria-style tables (and prisons) in the US in the 20s:






My kids primary school has something similar to those, but in plastic unfortunately.

-------------
Helixing my inner beanie


Posted By: Iron Horse
Date Posted: 26 Apr 2019 at 7:43pm
Picked up a couple jappaned/copper flash 'piggy banks'; had someone make an offer on them in less than 24 hours, but I took photos for posterity:






-------------
https://www.instagram.com/ritestuff_bryan/" rel="nofollow - IG: ritestuff_bryan


Posted By: BlueTrain
Date Posted: 03 Jul 2019 at 12:33pm
I liked the photos of the wall clocks. And you don't know how long I stared at the pictures, expecting the minute hand to move.



Print Page | Close Window

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10 - http://www.webwizforums.com
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd. - https://www.webwiz.net